Painterly Effects with Various Ink Refills

Posted On: 11/05/14

Materials are simple- Colorless Blender and B12 for sky, a Copic proof pen (Hi Tec C) and some greens for trees. Oh, tissue paper for blotting excess ink.

Hi everyone, I’m Becca Hillburn, the artist behind Nattosoup - an art, tutorial, and review blog geared toward comic enthusiasts.

I primarily consider myself a comic artist, working with traditional media such as Bristol, technical pens (mainly Copic Multiliners), and brush pens, but I do a lot of work with

 

Copic Sketch markers as well - from toning comic pages to coloring commissions. Most of my marker work is either done in my sketchbook as studies, or on the same Bristol I use for comic pages. That said, I’m always up for learning new tricks and trying new techniques.

So for this adventure in Copics, I’ll show you how to use Various Inks to get some neat effects. This technique would be a fantastic way to do skies, water, even the sides of buildings.

I’ve noticed a couple artists - doctorCOPIC and Kareena Zerefos - utilizing a more painterly approach to rendering with Copic inks, and I’ve long wanted to achieve similar results in my own work. Here's a great example of how doctorCOPIC uses Various Inks for painterly effects:

This technique takes advantage of Copic’s watercolor-esque aesthetic, pushing it even further by mimicking many of watercolor’s strong points—an unpredictability from wet into wet and wet into dry mixing that many find quite charming. This cannot always be reproduced using traditional Copic marker rendering.

This technique forgoes that for not-so-simple mixing of the Various Inks. While the technique may seem simple at a glance, it takes a little practice and experimentation to get specific results.

To start with, I used three types of paper:

- Yupo Watercolor - a synthetic, tree-less paper made of polypropylene (chosen for its ability to resist water- for this technique, I wanted the ink to pool)
- Copic’s Bleedproof Marker Pad (chosen because that’s usually the recommended option)
- Borden & Riley #90 Vellum Sheer Trace (chosen because it’s a very excellent, heavy tracing paper with a nice finish, and tracing paper is the standard recommendation for this technique).

workspace image My workspace for this particular project. (not shown: Borden & Riley Vellum pad, it's huge.)

The Copics and Various Inks I'll be using, a mixing tray, pipettes, and some inspiration (the Copic Catalogue for 2012). I used a variety of Various Inks- the Colorless Blender (0) as a general base, W5, B12, and R81. In the marker department, I mainly used Copic Sketch, BV23, YG03, B14, B00, B32, YG03, YG67, Y000, Y04, BG99, and BG98. I also used a Copic Ciao Colorless Blender (0). Close up of supplies My goal throughout this experimentation was to play with the Various Inks. I’ve dabbled with watercolor ink and water-soluble inks before, but never alcohol soluble inks, and although I’d anticipated that they would dry quickly. I hadn’t anticipated how quickly they’d dry while still on the palette.

My method in the beginning was to pour some of the various ink (one color at a time) into the wells in the palette, and then pull up ink using a pipette. This allowed me more precise application than simply dripping it from the bottle, as it was easier for me to vary the pressure on the pipette to get the droplet size I wanted.  Unfortunately the ink evaporates fairly quickly, so I used a lot of ink this way.Ink dripped on Yupo Ink dripped on Yupo Copic Bleedproof Paper Copic Bleedproof PaperVellum Tracing Paper Vellum Tracing Paper

As you can see, the ink reacts differently on all three paper types. On the Yupo and the Vellum, it pools on the surface for a little while before drying. On the Copic Bleedproof, it sinks right in.

Next I wanted to see how the inks would react when another color was dripped on top. By this time, the inks had somewhat dried on the surface of the papers, making this a wet into dry application. R81 dripped into B12 on Yupo R81 dripped into B12 on YupoR81 dripped into B12 on Copic Bleedproof R81 dripped into B12 on Copic BleedproofR81 dripped into B12 on Vellum Paper R81 dripped into B12 on Vellum Paper W5 dripped onto R81 and B12 on YupoW5 dripped onto R81 and B12 on Copic Bleedproof Marker Paper W5 dripped onto R81 and B12 on Copic Bleedproof Marker PaperW5 dripped onto R81 and B12 on Tracing Paper W5 dripped onto R81 and B12 on Tracing Paper

With a wet into dry ink application, the newly applied ink tends to push the pigment in the dry ink, and creates a harsh delineation between fresh and dry ink. This makes for some pretty trippy effects, and works best on slow absorption papers like Yupo and tracing paper. I next applied Colorless Blender to see if it would push all pigment away. Colorless Blender applied on top of W5, R81, and B12 on Yupo.Colorless Blender applied onto W5, R81, and B12 on Copic Bleedproof Marker Paper.  No visible difference. Colorless Blender applied onto W5, R81, and B12 on Copic Bleedproof Marker Paper. No visible difference.Colorless Blender applied on top of W5, R81, and B12 on vellum tracing paper. Colorless Blender applied on top of W5, R81, and B12 on vellum tracing paper.

With the Yupo and the Vellum tracing paper, the effect was immediate and very noticeable. Although the prior pigment did not entirely leave the page, there’s a noticeable difference in hue where the Colorless Blender has been dripped.

With the Copic Bleedproof paper, there was no difference where the Colorless Blender has been dripped and where it has not. I don’t have much experience with this paper, so I’m not sure if that’s due to oversaturation or what. I do know that with the Yupo and Vellum, the ink does not actually sink into the paper, so it’s very easy to get immediate effects, but very hard to layer.

I thought that since the Copic Bleedproof Marker paper absorbed the ink so quickly, it might be fun to try a drip test. I was hoping to get a nifty tye-dye effect without actually having to wrinkle up my paper. I applied the ink so that the colors were close but not touching, and held it at a slight angle (less than 25 degrees) so the ink would slowly run. Not exactly the most impressive display of colors ever seen. The colors mixed into a brown, expect different results with different colors.

I waited a couple days for the ink to fully dry on these pages (even now, the ink on the Yupo is still tacky) and scanned them. Wet into Dry on Yupo Wet into dry on Yupo.Wet into Slightly Damp on Copic Bleedproof Marker Paper Wet into slightly damp on Copic Bleedproof marker paper. Hanging drip test Copic Bleedproof marker paper.Wet into dry on vellum tracing paper. Wet into dry on vellum tracing paper. Next I decided to experiment with wet into wet application of ink. This time, I didn’t bother with the droppers, I just dropped ink straight from the Various Ink bottles.

For this technique, you need to work pretty quickly; otherwise the ink will dry before you’ve finished applying ink. What’s nice about this technique is you do get color blending effects you would not be able to achieve with markers alone. Unfortunately, due to the restraints of this technique, I could not take in-process photos, but let me assure you, it really is as simple as “Drip one color. Cap. Drip another color, possibly into first color.”

After letting the colors dry a little, I pulled out my markers. I was hoping to push and pull the ink easily, but that would require a braver woman than I, as even a little markering quickly colors the nib. The dripped ink builds up more residue on the papers surface than ink applied via marker, so if you’re going to noodle about with this technique, be forewarned.

Getting a little color on your nib wont cross-contaminate or ruin them. Nibs can be worked back to their normal coloring by drawing on a separate piece of paper.  Working the ink with the Copic Ciao Colorless Blender.Just a little dabbling and you can see it's getting kind of dirty. With just a little dabbling on scratch paper you can work the color out of the nib.Along the W5 you can see where I've gone in with the Colorless Blender. It doesn't remove all color, but it softens the edge on the grey. Along the W5 you can see where I've gone in with the Colorless Blender. It doesn't remove all color, but it softens the edge on the grey.

Here's the scanned wet into wet with marker test. The upper right hand circle of R81 and W5 ink are typical of wet into wet blending. I tested the Colorless Blender, and also a green (YG03) and a greyish blue (BV23). Here's the scanned wet into wet with marker test. The upper right hand circle of R81 and W5 ink are typical of wet into wet blending. I not only tested the Colorless Blender, but also a green (YG03) and a greyish blue (BV23). Wet into wet with marker test. As you can see, not all colors are equally effective at removing the original color. BV23 (lower left) is surprisingly ineffective at removing or blending, whereas YG03 is very effective at removing color, but not blending. Not quite the painterly effect I had in mind.

Next I played with wet into wet techniques using Yupo. I realized early on that using a regular Copic marker with Yupo would probably just wreck the nib, as the Yupo absorbs none of the ink. With the Yupo, I tested how colors would react when dripped into a pool of Colorless Blender. I worked loose and fast with this, first creating a pool of colorless blender, then dripping in the B12, then the R81, and finally the W5. As you can see, you even get some nice color layering that I hadn’t expected. I worked loose and fast with this, first creating a pool of colorless blender, then dripping in the B12, then the R81, and finally the W5. As you can see, you even get some nice color layering that I hadn’t expected.I let that dry for a while, and then dripped some Colorless Blender on top. I let that dry for a while, and then dripped some Colorless Blender on top.The scanned result.  Sadly, my photos don't do the colors justice The scanned result. Sadly, my photos don't do the colors justice.

After all this experimentation, I wanted to try and actually create something with intention. I set an easy goal - a quick, believable blue sky, and set to work. I chose to work on the vellum tracing paper, as I felt it gave me the best result, and though I started with a limited palette, I kept returning to my marker box for more color choices. Materials are simple- Colorless Blender and B12 for sky, a Copic proof pen (Hi Tec C) and some greens for trees. Oh, tissue paper for blotting excess ink. Materials are simple - Colorless Blender and B12 for sky, a Copic proof pen and some greens for trees. Oh, tissue paper for blotting excess ink.Apply Colorless Blender and then QUICKLY apply B12. It will end up bleeding past the tree line. That's ok. Note: When soaking the paper this way, it will probably curl. You could solve this by taping it down prior to applying ink. Apply Colorless Blender and then QUICKLY apply B12. It will end up bleeding past the tree line. That's OK.

Note: When soaking the paper this way, it will probably curl. You could solve this by taping it down prior to applying ink.Blot again to remove the harsh delineation between Colorless Blender and B12. Blot excess inks. Apply Colorless Blender where you desire clouds.Blot again to remove the harsh delineation between Colorless Blender and B12. Blot again to remove the harsh delineation between Colorless Blender and B12.Apply shading to clouds (B00) and darken blue of sky (B14) with super brush of marker. Apply with careful little strokes.  Apply shading to clouds (B00) and darken blue of sky (B14) with super brush of marker. Apply with careful little strokes.Keep applying, dabbing, and noodling around until it's where you'd like. Keep applying, dabbing, and noodling around until it's where you'd like.Filled in the trees with markers. Fill in the trees with markers. As the focus was not the trees; I just filled them in via Sketch Marker with G28, YG03, YG67.  I also put a little sunshine highlight of Y000 and Y04 on the clouds. The big key with this technique is to keep playing with it until it’s where you’d like it to be. 

If you make a mistake, it’s fairly easy to fix - just saturate your blotter with some Colorless Blender, and wipe away.  The ink won’t come off entirely, but most of it will, and if you color over that area with a slightly darker color, it won’t be very noticeable. Unfortunately, my scanner doesn't capture the color very well, even with tweaking. My scanner doesn't capture the color very well, even with tweaking.A well-lit photograph of the finished sky.A well-lit photograph of the finished sky. My notes on this piece may be difficult to read, so I’ll transcribe them:

Goal: Create a blue sky quickly 1. Coat with colorless blender 2. Drip B12 3. Spread ink (I used a tissue, try a cotton ball) 4. Reapply drops of Colorless Blender 5. Dab up excess 6. Add shading to clouds (B00) 7. Continue to drip, dab, and noodle 8. For selective lowlights dab B32 9. You can soften marker dabs by applying Various Ink to tissue and dabbing over 10. You can pull white highlights by dabbing in Colorless Blender Tracing vellum is a great way to replicate watercolor techniques but because the ink doesn’t sink in, new ink pushes out old instead of blending. It’s difficult to build up ink. A very messy, hard to control technique.

So there you go, hope you enjoyed this tutorial on using Various Inks to create painterly effects. I'll leave you with some considerations for manipulation to make while working with Various Inks:

  • Ink moves with air (blowing, hairdryer, fan)
  • Ink can be lifted while wet using cotton swab
  • Ink can be lifted when dry using cotton swab dipped in Colorless Blender
  • Can drip additional color or Colorless Blender into ink when dry
  • Can drip additional color or Colorless Blender into ink when wet
  • Can work markers into ink after dry

For more from Becca Hilburn, check out Nattosoup, her CopicColor gallery, or let her know how much you enjoyed her tutorial on Twitter.

Tags: Artists, Becca Hillburn, How To, Illustration, Inspire, Painting, Various Ink, Edited, Guest tutorial, Technique